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MG MGB GT V8 Factory Originals Technical - V8 Breather 'in' Filter

I posted a few weeks back regarding the Breather 'In' filter fitted to factory MG b V8's - mine was missing. Thanks to the people who replied I managed to locate where it should have been connected found there was no hoses etc; just the pipe from the rear of the engine block that points vertically sort of below the carburettor airbox. I then tried to source a replacement.
I managed to get a K&N style filter that should work as a good replacment:

http://i9.ebayimg.com/01/i/01/5f/5d/b7_1.JPG

I am now looking at where to position this as I cannot connect it directly to the pipe at the rear of the engine due to the poistion of the pipe and the size of the filter (its about 6cm tall and 5cm wide). The connector is also designed to fit on a pipe rather than a hose (jubilee clip etc).

I was thinking of getting some hose and making my own connections up and then positioning the filter to the rear left of the carburettor airbox? Would this be OK?

Thanks

Andy


A Butterworth

Did you try all the usual suspects for a proper replacement? But as I recall I mentioned mine looks exactly the same as the in-line fuel filter, and checking the Parts Catalogue it does indeed have the same part number. Bracket and main hose should be easy, the only tricky bit being the U-shaped hose on the open end of the filter. And for that I think I'd get a length of metal pipe that fits in the appropriate-sized hose and bend that to act as a former.
Paul Hunt

I did but I saw this one on eBay and after a few emails to the seller (a V8 parts specialist in Northern Ireland) I thought I could just attach this onto the pipe exiting the rear of the engine block. I have just had a play about and its a bit too awkward to fir this to the pipe directly.
As I said I think I just need to hose, a bit of metal pipe to connect the filter and hose to and then somewhere to mount it...

Andy
A Butterworth

air filterr earlier post and realized that the pipe at the back on my Rover 3.5 didn
Bruce

Bruce - won't that give you suction on *both* ends of the crankcase breathing system? Unlikely to be equal it is true and so there should always be some through flow, but probably not as much as was intended i.e. if the rear breather were in free air.
Paul Hunt

Interesting point Paul. The carb would be trying to suck air into it and at the other end the breather tube would be trying to suck air into it. Looks like I will have to re-think this. Thanks

Bruce
Bruce Mills

Bruce:
Good to see that you survived the winter. It was a rough one here on the east coast. I'm still in the "construction phase of my conversion but will be driving this summer.
In the emission control section of my Rover Manual, the diagram shows a small in line filter (called engine breather filter) attached to the end of the small right angle tube that protrudes from the rear of the block. The hose from that filter goes into the carb air filter canister. The airflow direction is shown as travelling from the engine to the canister. Also shown are "flame traps" - I think we call them PCV valves - attached to each rocker cover with the airflow direction shown from the engine (rocker cover) to the carbs.
Hope this helps. I can scan and e-mail the pages to you if you wish.
Regards
Phil
Phil O

Good to hear from you Phil I was just thinking about you the other day, wondering if you had dug yourself out yet.
That is good new that you will be driving this summer. Better plan on taking some time off work to enjoy the summer driving.
Thanks for the offer re e-mailing the info. I will check my manual (which is in the shop) and get back to you.


Bruce
Bruce Mills

"The hose from that filter goes into the carb air filter canister. The airflow direction is shown as travelling from the engine to the canister. Also shown are "flame traps" - I think we call them PCV valves - attached to each rocker cover with the airflow direction shown from the engine (rocker cover) to the carbs.
"

Can't 'both' (airflows) go from the engine to the carbs or the engine would collapse under the vacuum :o)

A PCV valve is generally a device that control how much air flows and is typically used when the suction is direct from the inlet manifold with wildly varying vacuum levels, the PCV valve reduces this to a relatively constant low level. With carb suction there is a relatively low level of suction most of the time and hence just flame traps/oil separators are used.
Paul Hunt

Paul/Andy
Which part numbers are you using?
I checked out K & N which has an interesting site http://www.knfilters.com/universal/univrndstrt.htm
which gives all the dimensions of a filter. It looks like the first one 62-2470 with a 5/16" mounting flange is the way to go! Nice and small.
Bruce
Bruce Mills

Andy,

the part number for the Real filter is 606168 this is a GOOD Rover # there are also 2 hoses the one from the pipe below the carbs has 2 - 90 degree bends and connects to the filter part # BHH1172 still a good # in the UK and the second is U shaped and fits on top of the filter it is NLA

Bob
BOB FISHER

This thread was discussed between 13/03/2004 and 24/03/2004

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