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MG MGF Technical - Replacing Fuel Filter

Hi.

Just changed the fuel filter for the first time on the F.
Note: it's a '99 VVC.
52000 km on the clock.

It's very, very easy. Since I've installed a K&N 57i and removed the old airbox plus ressonator box, the access is awesome. You just need to remove the boot grille, use a 14mm and 19mm spanner and that's about it.

Helps if you remove the K&N assembly as well. It's a jubilee clip...

Another advantage of the K&N!
Just wanted to share this with you.

Cheers, Valter.
Valter

I wonder why the K&N instructions say to leave the resonator box in place, because without it there is much more room, and I would have thought that more, cooler, air could get to the filter.

By the way, I understand that the original air intake hose (the one that clips to the resonator box) draws air from the coolest part of the engine bay (centre rear). I have redirected the exhaust end of the hose (i.e. the end that used to clip to the resonator box) to point towards the K&N, in the hope that it will help provide cooler air when stationary or moving slowly. Any thoughts?
Karl Woodhead

Nice one Valter. It does look to be an easy job for the K&N users :o) Pitty I've gone and fitted a Rover 820 airbox ROFL ;o)

>> I wonder why the K&N instructions say to leave the resonator box in place, because without it there is much more room, and I would have thought that more, cooler, air could get to the filter.<<

Hi Karl - yes, it would be better to remove the reasonance box. The reason, I suspect, why the instructions say to leave it in place are two fold:
1. it forms part of the inner wheel arch
2. to remove it would require either destroying it by cutting it to pieces or dropping the subframe. Both options are pretty intimidating to 90% of K&N's target audience!

>> By the way, I understand that the original air intake hose (the one that clips to the resonator box) draws air from the coolest part of the engine bay (centre rear). I have redirected the exhaust end of the hose (i.e. the end that used to clip to the resonator box) to point towards the K&N, in the hope that it will help provide cooler air when stationary or moving slowly. Any thoughts? <<

Great idea - except it will not work: lack of airflow. The underbody ducts work fine because they effectively scoop air from the airstream under the car, which relative to the car, is traveling at the same speed as your roadspeed.
Without this 'ram air' type effect, there is no airflow, and the K&N will simply ingest hot enginebay air - much to the detriment to power.

Your best option is to use the cool air ducts as K&N intended - or to enclose the filter in an airbox (which can be made of nearly anything - including flower pots!!!)
Rob Bell

Rob

As getting a K&N filter on the car appears to be the best pound per bhp tuning route

what would you say is THE best way of getting the job done to get max BHP/?

I currently have the flat panel K&N air filter in the OEM gubbins

Being a ego-laden management consultant we dont listen/understand very well, so a nice and straightforward "this is it answer" is best thanks


Neil

Neil,
I would suggest relocating the cold air ducts already in place (various sites sell ducts specifically for this)or go and buy some ducting from halfords. Or you could even drill an additional hole/s in the airbox to do the same. Did this in my old Rover coupe due to the pipercross filter I fitted drawing in warm air and was reasonably happy with the results I got from additional ducting and a 'normal' K&N in thye standard air box.

john
J Ip

>>
what would you say is THE best way of getting the job done to get max BHP/?

I currently have the flat panel K&N air filter in the OEM gubbins
<<

As you already have a K&N panel filter, the best option for you is to junk the connection to the reasonance box, and run a duct from the existing airbox to the nearside air intake (ie - what I think John is suggesting). This was the option taken by both Roger Parker and Bruno - and I have RR evidence that Bruno sent to me showing the good results: http://www.mgf.ultimatemg.com/alternative_filter_options.htm
Rob Bell

Hello,
This is all very interesting.
I have recently replaced my air filter with a standard one. If I had read this thread I would have gone the K&N route.
My air filter box was not connected properley with the connection underneath it before the filter change. This sounds like the bit described in the other threads as the resonator (if I got it right).
After changing the filter,I tried twisting and brute force with the resonator elbow to align it with the filter box. This will not join up, leaving a small air gap which is not good.
Any sugestions other than tape the two tubes together?
Thanks guys
Chris
Chris

Chris, although you've kept the standard filter, there is still value in connecting the base of your airbox to a tube run to the nearside air intake.

That elbow just pulls off (needs a bit of muscle though!). Suitable ducting is available from Demon Tweeks and other tuning shops.

Some more pix in the K&N 57i fitting instructions: http://www.mgf.ultimatemg.com/f_fitting.htm
Rob Bell

Thanks Rob,
<run to the nearside air intake>
Is that the scoop on the side of the car with the black grill?
Many thanks
Chris
Chris Jones

Rob,

Thanks for your comments. I realised that the K&N ducts work nicely due to the 'ram air' effect, however I thought that the K&N must also suck air in, in which case the vacuum created would maybe draw some air up the redirected old duct (as it's end is now very close to the filter).

Another question: does the (or any) filter box/flower pot make any difference to that sonerous induction hiss (if you can in fact have a sonorous hiss???) that the K&N provides?
Karl Woodhead

>> Is that the scoop on the side of the car with the black grill? <<

That's the one Chris :o)

>> however I thought that the K&N must also suck air in, in which case the vacuum created would maybe draw some air up the redirected old duct <<

Indeed it does - but it will draw air in from the area of least resistance, and of the greatest volume - which in this case will be the ambient warm air...

The only way to ensure a cool air supply to the filter located in an engine bay is to insulate/isolate it - and that usually means an airbox.

Regarding noise: yes, any airbox enclosure will reduce the amount of induction noise to some degree. The plant pot is likely to be less noise absorbant than say a carbon fibre airbox or ABS injected plastic one. Couldn't say by how much, because my 'zorst now makes the larger proportion of the tunes!
Rob Bell

This thread was discussed between 02/07/2004 and 07/07/2004

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