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MG parts spares and accessories are available for MG T Series (TA, MG TB, MG TC, MG TD, MG TF), Magnette, MGA, Twin cam, MGB, MGBGT, MGC, MGC GT, MG Midget, Sprite and other MG models from British car spares company LBCarCo.

MG TD TF 1500 - Fitting a 'Proper' Fuel Guage

My Octagon Car Club magazine arrived today. There is a letter seeking advice on fitting a fuel gauge to a TF. I know a Triumph Spitfire has a vertically mounted fuel gauge sender unit. I am pretty confident I could modify this to fit a T Series tank. I am uncertain whether the Triumph uses a bimetalic or magnetic gauge but there are many types available. Where could a gauge be mounted so it looked original or at least elegant? For instance I have KL heater and the ivory Bakelite rheostat knob is fitted into the small MG badge hole at the passenger's side of the dash. It matches the ivory indicator switch at the driver's side perfectly. I know "segmented" fuel gauges are available that could be fitted into the cluster gauge but I wouldn't want to dispense with any of the original ones. It's a pitty the TF doesn't have a cigarette lighter since that could be junked to liberate a space. Just a last thought I wonder what the Naylor TF 1700 does for a fuel gauge? The dash is different to an original TF and has circular instruments/gauges but the tank is the same so a sender unit must be available.

Cheers

Jan T
J Targosz

Jan, keep us updated on this project. I am sure many are interested in having a real fuel gauge on our cars.
Geoffrey M Baker

How to mount a float that travels through the full tank height is going to be a challenge. Capacitance type fuel level sensing as used in aircraft fuel tanks might be an option, however very difficult to fit without completely compromising the tank appearance.

Interesting challenge.
G Evans

It's an interesting issue. There are vertical sensors (for boats, lawnmowers and other machines) but probably none the right length.
I would think a very sensitive air pressure meter should be able to read the pressure in a small bladder in the bottom of the tank and as the gas goes down the pressure would decrease...
Definitely look forward to seeing what people do with this.
Geoffrey M Baker

Jan T. I mounted a voltmeter just behind the bottom edge of the dash just to the left of the steering column (and my knee) - it doesn't require any new holes because the gauge bracket bolts to an existing hole at the front of the H frame that supports the dash. I have various other switches for the electric fan, etc., and a cigarette lighter socket on a subsidiary panel under the dash attached to the same H frame but further back. My heater sits behind that. It looks good and works fine. Goog luck with finding something that can be installed in the tank - I think that is the difficult part.
Dave H
Dave Hill

Here is a capacitive one. It can be made in a length to fit the tank. One of the only ones I have found that long. Analog output. Negative ground.

The sensing pipe is just over 5/8" diameter.
I am not sure if that's thin enough to go through the drain hole in the bottom of the MG tank. I don't feel like crawling under.
If so an adapter could be machined that would screw into the tank and accept the flange.
This has adjustable set levels for full and empty so the extra below the tank should be able to be calibrated out.

No price shown but since its length is custom be prepared $$$.

http://gillsc.com/content/rxl-liquid-level-sensor.html

Jim B.
JA Benjamin

I'd be willing to bet money that that works with the flange on top only, Jim... If so, I suppose you could figure something out through the filler cap opening... maybe... but then you would have to remove to fill... etc etc...
Geoffrey M Baker

My measured stick from Moss many years ago works fine. Why add something when it is not ness. JMHO.
TRM Maine

Instead of hacking up the tank why not go with a remote read flow metering device. There are many out there that might do the job.

Here is one.

http://www.scintex.com.au/products/fuel-flow-consumption-gauge-meter-boat-engine

I'm with TRM. Worrying about how much fuel is in the tank is all part of the experience. Worked fine when we were kids. Many of my cars were without fuel gauges and other not so important accessories. Maybe that's why we could buy them for fifty bucks.

dan
Dan Nordstrom

There are some possibilities for electrical devices that would fit: here's one

http://www.automation.com/automation-news/industry/honeywell-sensotec-announces-model-ll-v-vertical-entry-liquid-level-sensor

Could mount a variety of ways, installed through the sender unit hole and into the drain plug?

Price unknown, definitely expensive, and connecting it to a meter... who knows?

Geoffrey M Baker

The cars have made it 64 years without a gas gauge... There is an odometer and trip odometer in the dash... What else do you need?

If you choose to modify a 64 year old car at least the next owner will have another DPO comment for the board in a few years. Regards, tom
tm peterson

Interesting topic. I have a 79 spitfire sitting in my garage and among the spares is a fuel sending unit. It looks very similar to the TD unit. I actually have the TD unit out of the tank also. So, tomorrow I will compare them and post the information.
Bruce TD4139 Cunha

Hi Bruce,

Excellent - I was going to buy a Spitfire unit to see if it could be converted but they are Ģ35 on eBay. The flange looks different on the Spitfire (a securing circlip rather than small bolts) but would be easy to convert. I think the angle the float moves through and its length will be critical. Because the unit is fitted low down in the tank the arm will have to be quite long and this could affect the angle between empty and full. I am looking forwards to your posting. Also I think a Mini had a vertically mounted sender unit. Another possibility?

Jan T
J Targosz

Here's a tank gauge that I have been building on and off (more off than on)!-an unfinished project. It's basically a slide gauge. When the float moves from bottom to top the twisted centre shaft rotates through 270°. The shaft bearing at the base is an industrial diamond. The actual indicator will pivot by a few degrees whereas the slide gauge is mounted at an angle in the tank-well at least that's how the theory goes....

Regards
Declan


D Burns

The fuel gauge in my Toyota has never worked so I drive using the trip meter. I reset it when I fill the tank. After years of practice I can now tell to with a litre or two when the tank is empty. I'd planned to do the same with the TD. Cheers
Peter TD 5801
P Hehir

delcan,
As usual, I appreciate your resourcefulness and creativity !!!! Great project !!!
Steve
Steve Wincze

Declan, great work! Will it be able to be mounted through the sender unit hole?
Geoffrey M Baker

Geoffrey,
No-vertically through the lid on the tank.
Regards
Declan
D Burns

Here's something interesting:

https://www.cooking-hacks.com/vertical-liquid-level-sensor

Cheap! And works in the waspmote universe, something like Arduino - connects to a low cost processor board with a wide universe of outputs. This may be something I buy to play with...

If it can live in a gasoline environment, you could easily mount it on a plate fitting on the sender unit hole, on an arm to hold it steady about an inch from the bottom of the tank.
Geoffrey M Baker

And another:

http://milonetech.com/products/chemical-etape-assembly

24 inch length, suitable for gasoline environments.
Geoffrey M Baker

Dipstick - You cut off a chunk of 1"x 1/4" wood which will fit in your toolbox, put a loop of string or some such in the top so you can't lose it, calibrate and mark it by putting a gallon at a time into an empty tank, and dip the tank whenever you want to. Works fine and leaves the car original.

Cheap, too.

David
David Provan

A fella sells these on fleebay for about 75 bucks.... I bought a small chunk of aluminium for 13 bucks along with the flat bar and got a friend to turn the tops to make up 5 of them. Sits in the tank with the cap closed. No need to put a smelly stick in the car some place.

MG LaVerne

Driven my TD for 38 years and never run out of fuel. The warning light comes on solid with about 3 gallons remaining or say 50-55 miles? My theory is whatever equipment is not on the car is not going to screw up and cause problems.
John Quilter

The warning light works perfectly! Flickers when getting low, on steady when very low! Spousal unit does not trust it, but it has been working flawlessly for 16 years! Why reinvent the wheel? If it is not broken, do not try to replace it with an unproven product! IMO!
Len Fanelli

I think we have a winner. The 1979 Spitfire sending unit is very nearly the same as the TD.

The Spitfire sending unit does have a locking ring, but under that the actual unit has holes that are nearly exactly the same as the TD. They need to be enlarged, but are in the same location as the TD.

My TD sending unit has a travel of 5". The Spitfire has a travel of 4.75"

The TD float goes out to the right. The Spitfire goes to the left, but it is reversible.

So far, I don't see any reason that the Spitfire float would not go right in to the TD gas tank. Calibrating it would take a little bending, but I think that is a very good candidate to play with if you want a real gauge.

Bruce TD4139 Cunha

Here is the TD and the Spitfire one on top of the other in the down position.

Bruce TD4139 Cunha

Here are the two in the up position

Bruce TD4139 Cunha

I might be wrong but I seem to remember the MGA was a direct replacement. Once you get one in the tank Bruce, how will you get it to register anything above a 1/4 of a tank?


I did run out of gas in the TF...the warning light bulb burnt out. Even with the stick I keep an eye on the trip meter.
MG LaVerne

The problem is that the tank is much taller so your new gauge will read full until the tank is half empty, at which point it will start to show changes, which will be deceiving (half full will equal maybe less than a quarter tank, etc) until it correctly reads empty...
Geoffrey M Baker

http://www.iboats.com/Moeller-Reed-Switch-Sending-Units-Wema/dm/view_id.368241

Moeller reed switch vertical tank sending unit (marine applications)

another possibility, this unit could be modifiable to sit in the gas cap opening, or even possibly (with epoxy sealing) be fit into the tank via the sender unit hole.
Geoffrey M Baker

Here's a picture

Geoffrey M Baker

Some interesting concepts being posted, personally I would not contemplate any solution unless it was mounted on the base of the tank in the drain hole. Making extra penetrations in the tank and connection wiring being visible are two no nos.

Graeme
G Evans

I agree, Graham, I don't want extra holes. However I see no problem running a wire through a blanking plate for the sending unit. There are after all holes in the existing unit that wires pass through!
I'd just use a small gauge bulkhead passthrough and epoxy and Bob's your uncle...
I'd imagine that whatever is used will have to mount either in the gas cap or the sender unit, preferably the sender unit plate because otherwise you have to take it out every time you put in gas :)
Geoffrey M Baker

I had the same issue woth new holes. it all started with a nice fuel meter in the "right" color that I could not resist to buy

Mike

Mike Fritsch

Then I acquired a vertical fuel sensor (for typical marine use) that works with a capacitive float. As you can see from the pics, it is not fully linear, but then which tank is linear...
The reading is in kOhms, so ranges from 240 to 30 Ohms.


Mike Fritsch

Here it is with the meter connected. Again, the meter is not linear with the sensor. The sensor is designed to work standig up (from the bottom). My original idea was to put it into the filler hole. The upside down operation could have been corrected by modifying the letters on the meter (F and E offer themselves for that...).
However, the flange and the electrics box on top donīt fit under the cap. It would also have to sit slanted because of the shape of the tank. So that idea did not work.
As stated above, I could not get myself to put a hole in the tank bottom. So the stuff has been sitting on the shelf for a while.

Mike Fritsch

Presumably its too long to insert through the hole for the current tank float assembly owing to the tank dividers? Otherwise it could have been held vertically by a bracket attached to a covering plate.
Dave H
Dave Hill

I see that Mike has already done much of the research on the vertical float units. I had already come to the conclusion that a vertical unit looked pretty much impossible without modifying the tank. My interest was wondering whether it could be introduced via the sender hole. I think the unit would require full disassembly and then somehow be reassembled inside the tank, so I can't imagine that would work.
I'm thinking that the most "doable" one would be this:
https://www.cooking-hacks.com/vertical-liquid-level-sensor

If it is designed to survive in a gas environment, it could easily be mounted on an arm on the sender unit hole blanking plate and held on or close to the bottom of the tank. The wire could be potted through the sender unit with epoxy and a small bulkhead fitting.

The problem is that its output is digital; it would require an Arduino board (a tiny computer for those not familiar with it) and then some digital to analog voltage processor to power a standard meter.
Geoffrey M Baker

This would be another possibility:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ultrasonic-Fuel-Oil-Air-Water-Level-Measuring-Transducer-Sensor-Detector-Kit-/231637287439?hash=item35eea8820f:g:z5AAAOSwMmBVubhj
It is stuck on the bottom of the tank and is non intrusive.

Regards
Declan
D Burns

Also interesting Declan. In checking on the one I posted (https://www.cooking-hacks.com/vertical-liquid-level-sensor), I just read that it in fact returns variable resistance, not a digital signal, which would make it much easier to use.
In either case, I see either unit could easily be installed on an arm on a blanking plate fitting the current sender unit hole, holding it to the bottom of the tank and require zero modifications, and full removeability.
One thing you have to admit about our modern world, adding sensors is getting easier and easier to do!
Geoffrey M Baker

Geoff,
It looks interesting but is it fuel resistant?

A very simple fool proof indicator would be a vented thick walled glass tube with a coloured plastic floating ball installed on and going down the side of the tank connecting via a plastic flexible tube onto a drain tap. The simple U-tube and the advantage of the drain tap. I was thinking of making one up. It could look pretty nice if done correctly. Perhaps even put the glass tube inside a slotted and graduated stainless steel or chrome pipe with a fancy vent on the top.

Regards
Declan

D Burns

I'm sure you could make up something very impressive and properly Victorian all in brass and glass... but then again, if you can only see it when you're out of the car, it's not quite as useful :)
Geoffrey M Baker

Declan, thatīs interesting - I was pondering a similar idea. There are glass tubes like that available for wine or other tanks with glass inside a metal protection with a viewing window. And the drain tap is an opening I was not aware of. But I donīt very much like the idea of a breakable glass filled with fuel outside the tank.

Rgds, Mike

Mike Fritsch

Geoffrey, one like that you could probably see in the side mirror if it is mounted on the driverīs side of the tank ;-)
You could even mount it inside the passenger compartment if it is at the right level.
Thinking one step further, it could also be just a clear tube with a straight bit the height of the tank, connected to the drain at the bottom and the other end going back to the top of the tank. Requires an extra hole, though.

Rgds, Mike
Mike Fritsch

The fuel gauge for a YB is a direct bolt in for the TF fuel indicator. . One would still have to work out a sending unit.
Larry Brown

A flow meter on the fuel line might be an interesting alternative. I don't know what is available but if a meter could be reset when the tank is filled and a digital output employed then it could be a solution.
Max Irvine

Mike,
That photo is exactly what I was thinking of.
Regards
Declan
D Burns

Perhaps something like this:
http://www.norcalbrewingsolutions.com/store/Sight_Glass_Stainless_Steel_16_inch.html

Regards
Declan
D Burns

I had a customized 1979 Ford Bronco years ago with a Lincoln 460 engine and I had installed a fuel metering device on it, it also gave mph and computed fuel usage. I think I removed the system when I sold the vehicle and might have it on a shelf somewhere in my shop. I'll look. Funny I never thought of this until now. PJ
Paul161

I found the the fuel managing system that I bought years ago, still in the original box with user manual etc. It was sold by Cal Customs and called the ZT-4 driving computer. Only for carburetor type engines, it measures mileage, speed and fuel consumption. When removing it from my Bronco, I put it back in it's original box. Probably very difficult to find one with everything that came with it. Pictures to come later. PJ
Paul161

I hoped to contact Hutsons today to find out what the Naylor/Hutsons TF replica uses for fuel level measurement. Unfortunately I have been too busy but have just been looking at the Naylor TF Club site and there is a picture of a dash showing a fuel gauge.

Jan T
J Targosz

Jan,
That's a good idea and I'm sure they have a solution. Their replica actually kooks quite nice if I am allowed to state that on here.

Regards
Declan
D Burns

Jan,
I sent them an enquiry just now. Let's see how they respond.

Regards
Declan
D Burns

When i want to ck. fuel level and the light is not on i just move the wheel smartly left and right to get the gas sloshing in the tank. If fule light does not flash am ok. TDC/22679
Forrest Rubenstein

Declan,
I have seen a Naylor with the doors hung the correct way and you would be hard pushed to say 'Replica'.
I believe all the panels except the doors and rear apron were interchangeable with the TF.
I spent many happy hours in the 70's rooting around Naylors for bits and pieces.
Ray TF 2884
Ray Lee

Ray,
I believe you-it certainly looks impressive. I did look into the Gentry replica and discovered that they use a Morris Oxford tank.


Regards
Declan
D Burns

Reading more on liquid level sensors, they seem to fall into a few types. Float/mechanical vane, float/Hall sensor, atmospheric pressure, capacitance, ultrasonic and infrared.
In general, I don't think infrared or ultrasonic will work well. They seem to be designed for standing liquid situations, a beam at the top is aimed at the liquid and returns a signal. Sloshing liquid would confuse them. One ultrasonic type mounts outside the tank and I can't imagine it would work well with a running engine, though it might be fine when stopped.
Of the two float types, one is mechanical with a spiraling vane being turned by a float as it rises and falls, turning (effectively) a potentiometer at the top; and the other is a row of magnetic sensors (Hall effect sensors) on a rod and a float with magnets on it it trips the sensors as it moves up and down.
Capacitance relies on a change of current between two plates as liquid falls or rises; and atmospheric pressure relies on the actual weight of the liquid changing. One fairly cheap type is available good for chemical environments, however the top part would require sealing for use in our gas tanks.
The most difficult to install are the long rod types; the vertical floats. I haven't seen a single one that would install via the bottom drain, and you could not get a 19 inch straight rod into the tank via the sender hole.
The most promising, in my mind, are the atmospheric pressure units. Industrial models designed for oil well use are available (starting at about $400, fuggedaboudit!) and would undoubtedly work. But not in our price range. These lie on the bottom of the tank with a cable out to the meter and power.
I have written to two companies asking for more information, Gill products (who make a straight sensor which might be adaptable) and the company cookinghacks which advertises a cheap liquid level which might or might not work in a gasoline environment.
I'll let you know what more I find out.
Geoffrey M Baker

I'm in discussion with Chris Milone who makes the etape sensor. He thinks it might be flexible enough to install via the sender hole and can be made to withstand the gas environment (the top section will need "potting" to seal it). It can be made to the correct length.

http://milonetech.com/products/chemical-etape-assembly

Might work....?

Geoffrey M Baker

Sounds promising Geoff.
I did some design work last year on what the face of such a fuel gauge could look like to blend in with the rest of the car. Not unlike what Mike posted above.
The idea was to use a modern fuel gauge and replace the dial and the hand. Such hands are readily available.

Regards
Declan



D Burns

Declan, the etape has two possible outputs: "a standard voltage divider" and 0-5VDC Resistance to voltage
What would we need to make either of these work? I'm not sure what a standard voltage divider is...

Your meter looks great, as you say we can just put a decal on pretty much any modern meter...
Geoffrey M Baker

etape:

The standard voltage divider output looks like we can work with it.

max voltage is 10v so we would have to reduce that. Between full and empty, the resistance will vary from .4kOhm to around 3kOhm

Resistance Gradient: 150 ohms/inch (60 ohms/cm)
Power Rating: 0.5 Watts (VMax = 10V)
Geoffrey M Baker

Cost is going to be a factor in the solution, there are any number of commercial pressure transducers in the market place which are designed to measure fuel level using the hydrometric principle.

Some are designed to be installed in the bottom of tanks( the drain plug hole in our tanks would be ideal) and are fabricated with a threaded spigot to facilitate installation.

Interfacing to an indicator may be difficult however many that I have observed have 0-5V outputs, operate on 12V and can be scaled to be compatible with the tank height dimensions.

Solution will come down to how deep your pockets are and how greedy your need.
G Evans

Absolutely. Right now I think the etape sensor is available in the size and type necessary (18 inches, gasoline compatible) for about $75 including controller.
It's uncontrolled output is 200-3000 ohms (approx.)
They offer a controller which will output this as 0-5v
and one that will output it between 4-20ma
We believe the etape could be installed via the sender hole, flexing it until it fits in.

The unit operates on 6-40v

With the 0-5v controller, you can power a 0-5v panel meter, which can be had for $5. All you need is a compatible housing and a decal face reading E-F ...


All the commercial models are expensive, starting at about $400 and going up from there.
Geoffrey M Baker

I'm not an electrical engineer, so perhaps someone can help me out here. A standard fuel meter is driven by an electrical supply generating between 0 and 280 ohms. (A variety of different sensors on automobiles use this, sometimes reversed, but generally in this range).
The etape sensor can generate the following outputs:
0-5 volts (via available processor)
4-20 mA (via available processor)
or without any processing, it outputs approx. 400-3000 ohms.
What would be needed to get an output that would drive a standard 12v fuel meter?
(The etape will run on between 6-40v)
Thanks for the help...
Geoffrey M Baker

Trying to work out if a standard panel meter might work, here is a $5 panel meter with Declan's fuel gauge face superimposed... it's a pretty good fit. I imagine something could be cobbled together to fit a standard 2 1/16 inch gauge bracket...

Geoffrey M Baker

Geoffrey,
There is a chap on ebay selling gauge matchers. It doesn't cover the whole range of the etape sensor and is not cheap.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/251240184459?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Regards
Declan
D Burns

Declan, did you get any further in developing the decals for gauges? If not, I can start working on building a good gauge decal based on photos of existing gauges etc.
I'm leaning towards just building one from a panel meter. Should work, without the need for a gauge matcher or other electronics. The downside is it may be very twitchy...
Geoffrey M Baker

Geoffrey,
I will meet up with a mate of mine in the printing business on Wednesday evening. He can do that type of thing. I have already discussed it with him (on several occasions) but I never got around to doing it.
I would like to have them done on thin aluminium if at all possible. I also did the graphics for the ignition switch.

Regards
Declan

D Burns


Geoffery.

Volts do not generate ohms.
The fuel sensor may be a resistor that varies (rheostat) between 0 and 280 ohms.
All analog meters are basically current meters. At heart they measure current.

Voltage is analogous the pressure in a garden hose.
Current is like the flow of water in a garden hose.
Resistance is like a restriction in the garden hose. Resistance reduces the flow of current at a given voltage or pressure. You would need to increase the voltage (pressure) to maintain the current.

Given a resistance R and a voltage V you can calculate the current flow using Ohms Law. V=IR
If you know the current flow and the resistance you can calculate the voltage required to produce the flow. I=R/V

You can make a current meter read voltage by inserting a large resistor in series. If the meter is a 1 milliamp meter at heart, (It often is) and you want to make it read 1 Volt full scale, you use a 1000 ohm resistor. If you want 12 volts full scale you use a 12000 ohm resistor.
If we take your 0 to 280 ohm fuel sensor and put a 280 ohm resistor in series and connect it to a 12 V supply, at the junction of the resistor and the sensor, it would read 6 volts when the tank is full. It would read 0 volts when the tank is empty. Now that is not a good thing to do since the 12 volt supply in your MG varies from about 11.5 volts to around 14.5 volts.
You could stabilize this voltage with a regulator of some sort and also reduce the voltage a bit.
I converted my 46 CJ-2A from 6 to 12 V, and stuck in a 6 V zener diode to stabilize things and to use all the old gages. That was 30 years ago and its still there.

Often the after market fuel gages have a regulator built in and they will then tell you what kind of a sensor its designed for.

Jim B.

JA Benjamin

You can use the voltage stabiliser from a Morris Minor/Mini. They run at 10.2V and the originals were not polarity sensitive. The repros are.

Regards
Declan
D Burns

Here's a link

http://www.holden.co.uk/displayproducts.asp?sg=2&pgCode=070&sgName=Hardware&pgName=Gauges&agCode=0611&agName=Smiths+Classic+Gauge+Fittings&pageno=2
Regards
Declan
D Burns

Here's a gauge face I just made in photoshop.

Geoffrey M Baker

Here's a modified gas gauge face with a 5v meter showing, they are a near perfect fit.

Geoffrey M Baker

Oh dear what have I started. 70+ responses and all I wanted was a suggestion where a fuel gauge could be fitted to a TF dash board! There must be many owners who have run out of fuel! The absolutely ideal answer would be a four instrument cluster in the centre of the dash rather than the original three. Anyone know of a car which had a suitable gauge? I suppose the costs of press tooling to make a suitable face would be high but four gauges would fit symmetrically around an octagon.

Happy Christmas to all, family and friends

Jan T
J Targosz

You could consider removing the combination Horn/dipper switch and inserting a fuel gauge there.
In place of the removed combination, add a horn button to the steering wheel hub, I have seen that done.
In place of the dipper switch add a modern-ish stalk to the column.

Jim B.
JA Benjamin

I have a water temp gauge below the dash added by a PO. I could remove that and replace my oil gauge with an oil/water gauge and then put the fuel meter where the water meter is now.
Geoffrey M Baker

Merry Xmas to you to Jan. Fitting the gauge isn't the problem. That's really easy. Your 70 + responses deal with finding a simple way of generating the info & getting it to the gauge using a "language" it can interpret. That's where the problem lies & I don't see a simple solution. Cheers
Peter TD 5801
P Hehir

Actually I am nearly there. Etape installed via the sender hole, 0-5v controller output, 0-5v panel gauge with Jaeger decal. Cost well under $100. Just have to order parts, test and make decal.
Geoffrey M Baker

If anyone is interested in a copy of the fuel gauge face as a digital file, please email me at geoffreybaker@cox.net. I can create it for you in a variety of formats. Currently it is .psd.
The color was scanned from a reproduction oil decal and will of course vary depending on your machine and printer etc.


Geoffrey M Baker

1
John Walton

This thread was discussed between 03/12/2015 and 19/01/2016

MG TD TF 1500 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live MG TD TF 1500 BBS is active now.