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MG TD TF 1500 - fuel filter recommendation ?

I think I need to put a fuel filter between the pump and the carb. When driving on really winding roads, I seem to get a fuel problem, that eventually works itself out.

Can anyone recommend a filter (fram, etc), preferably clear so that I can tell if it dirty. If not, does anyone know what size inlet/outlet pipes I should get for the standard braid covered fuel hose ?

Thanks,
Larry
Larry Ayres

fuel pumping Larry
I have had good success with Purolator
John

Along with Larry Ayers, I too would like to get some fuel filter recommendations, so I will be watching this thread.

Here is a picture of what I have now installed by the PO.

http://home.tx.rr.com/lkarpman/filter.JPG

I have no idea what make/model it is so I can get a new insert (papaer?). I'd like to replace the unit at some point with a better one in the same location, and perhaps use the same fittings. If anyone can ID this one, I'd appreciate it. No markings other than "Made in USA" and "In" for the connector. Thanks

Larry

L Karpman

Larry: What you have looks exactly what I had on my 34 ford V-8. It had no filter element but was strictly a sediment bowl, to catch any sand etc. You might check Early Ford V-8 Parts in Ballston Spa, New York.
SEAMUS
F. HEALY

Thanks SEAMUS. In that case, if it's just a sediment bowl, I'd rather replace the whole unit. All suggestions of any filters that will fit in that area welcomed.

Larry
L Karpman

What is thread type used on on the carb and pump?

Dave
52TD
mgaviator

Good Morning again Larry
The Purolator Pro #805 is the one I installed. I mounted it between the tank and the pump, it's clear and you can watch it. Others in our club mounted it under the car out of sight, but you can't watch it unless you crawl under the car. My worry was forgetting about it. So my mounting position was after the tank, but before the fuel pump on the scuttle. This will let you watch it and it filters before the gas gets to the fuel pump and carburetors. John
John

John: I found this doing a Google search for the Purolator Pro 805. Might want to check your date of manufacture on the housing, but this dates back to 2001.

Purolator Products, Inc.

Models:
Purolator Fuel Filter


Purolator Pro-Fuel Fuel Filter


NAPA Fuel Filter

Number Involved: 45,314

Dates of Manufacture: June - September 2001

Defect: The polymer used for the housing in the suspect fuel filters may not be compatible with xylene, toulene, MEK, ethanol and other chemicals sometimes found in fuel systems. Prolonged exposure to such chemicals can result in degradation of the polymer that, in turn, weakens the filter housing. The filter housing may leak, possibly resulting in a vehicle fire. The fuel filters were shipped by ArvinMeritor and are identified by Purolator Part Numbers 804, 805, and 806, and NAPA Part Nos., 624804, 624805, and 624806 with an eight-character date code that begins with any of the following combinations: SO6M14, SO6M15, SO6M18, SO6M19, SO6M20, SO6M21, SO6M22, SO6M25, SO6M26, SO6M27, SO6M28, SO6M29, SO6M30, SO7M02, SO7M03, SO7M05, SO7M06, SO7M07, SO7M09, SO7M10, SO7M11, SO7M12, SO7M13, SO7M16, SO7M17, SO7M18, SO7M19, SO7M20, SO7M21, SO7M23, SO7M24, SO7M25, SO7M26, SO7M27, SO7M30, SO7M31, SO8M01, SO8M02, SO8M06, SO8M07, SO8M08, SO8M09, SO8M10, SO8M13, SO8M14, SO8M15, SO8M16, SO8M17, SO8M20, SO8M21, SO8M22, SO8M23, SO8M27, SO8M28, SO8M29, SO8M30, SO9M04, SO9M05, SO9M06, SO9M07, SO9M08, SO9M09, SO9M10, SO9M11, SO9M12, SO9M13, SO9M17, SO9M18, SO9M19.
Remedy: ArvinMeritor will notify its customers to return the filters for a replacement filter. The manufacturer has reported that owner notification began Nov. 7, 2001. Owners who do not receive the free replacement filter within a reasonable time should contact ArvinMeritor LVA Customer Service at 1-800-637-0580.
[NHTSA Recall No. 01E056]

L Karpman

Dave - The threads on the fuel pump and carburetors is 1/4 BSP.

All - With today's fuel there is little need for a filter in the fuel line beyond the one that is in the fuel pump itself. Most of us with T series MGs are the product of the day when pump fuel was rather dirty and it was anybody's guess what was going into one's fuel tank, so we are rather programmed to include a fuel filter somewhere in the line between the tank and the carburetors. further on this line o thinking, the orifice in the SU carburetors used in our cars are large enough to flush anything smaller than pea gravel right on through.

My suggestion is that if you are experiencing any sediment in your float bowls, it is time to take a good look at your fuel tank for rust, which is the most common thing found in the fuel pumps that I work on. If you have any rust showing up anywhere in the fuel system it is an indication that you need to thoroughly clean the interior of the tank and then have it sealed against further rust.

If you still want to install a filter, the clear ones would be the best choice, so it can be seen if they are getting dirty. Further, to avoid damage to the pump, should the filter become clogged sufficiently to stop fuel flow, the filter should be installed between the pump and the carburetors. All SU fuel pumps have a swamping resistor in parallel with the coil (and inside the coil housing where it can't be seen) that serves as all or part (depending on the age of the pump) of the arc suppression circuit for the points. This resistor consists of a very fine length of nichrome resistance wire that will burn through if the pump stalls in a current on condition and the power is left on for any length of time while the driver tries to figure out what is wrong. Any kind of clog on the inlet side of the pump (such as an extremely dirty filter) will cause the pump to stall in a current on condition. Once the swamping resistor is burned through, the points will arc excessively, burning them down prematurely and stopping the permanently. Worse, since the owner can't see the burned out resistor and will replace the points, only to have them burn out in a short time and will start cursing anything prefaced with SU.

Yes, I know that the SU fuel pumps have an internal filter on the inlet side of the pump already. This filter is a rather course filter meant to catch large rocks and small birds only, it does not stop fine rust particles, which are the problem. Today's high efficiency filters are designed to catch very tiny particles and will clog very quickly if there is rust in the fuel tank that is sending the very fine rust particles forward to the carburetors. As long as this type of filter is placed between the fuel pump and the carburetors, no damage will be done to the pump because, like when the needle valves in the carburetors close, a clogged filter in this position will stop the pump in a current off condition. Cheers - Dave
David DuBois

Dave,
Thanks for your in-depth info. I have looked into my tank with a flashlight and don't see any sediment. I haven't pulled the float bowl lids off yet to look, but I suspect there must be some rust or something. I will install a clear filter, on the outlet side of the pump if I install one.

The only other thing that I can imagine that might cause similar behavior would be if the floats themselves were rubbing against the side of the chambers and getting stuck, but that doesn't seem likely. Or else the pins are badly worn or something. I have a long stretch of very windy roads that follow a creek on my way home and this is what perturbs it.

Do you know the rough ID of the hose going to the carbs ?

thanks,
Larry
Larry Ayres

Larry,
One easy "check" you can do for rust in tank is with a magnetic parts pick-er-uper..the telescopic kind.
Yes ...I admit it ...fitting gas filler back on the car and dropped a screw in the tank! "DEE-DA-DEE" for sure ....hey but I did get the screw back, found out the 1st "clean & seal gas tank money" I gave somebody was not well spent....pulled some really "nastie chunks" of rust out my tank,
and at least it was safer than looking with a bic lighter!
Cheers,
David 55 TF1500 #7427
David Sheward

Larry - The ID of the fuel hose is 1/4". That is an interesting problem that you describe. I can't imagine that the floats would catch on the side of the float bowl, but I suppose that the pivot pins or the float levers could be worn sufficiently to cause that kind of problem. You might want to contact Joe Curto http://www.joecurto.com/ and pose the question to him. Joe is the go to man for SU carbs over here. Cheers - Dave
David DuBois

I am following this thread with interest because I just installed a new tank on which I also had the interior sealed. Prior to running the engine I ran the pump into a glass bowl and find that I am pulling up a lot of very fine particulate matter. Does anyone make an in-line fuel filter that doesn't require the lines be cut?

Dave
52TD
mgaviator

Dave,
I think I saw that moss has a very expensive chrome plated piece with an internal filter. They say that it can be installed either by cutting, or if you remove the tapered ends, it has 5/16" connectors. Only problem, other than the price, and lack of visibility inside the filter is that I don't know if the thread is the same so that it could connect to the hose, itself.

I went to NAPA this weekend and bought a #3001 filter, which is a fairly large clear filter with 1/4" ends. With clamps it was less than $5. They had a smaller filter, that looked like a VW filter, but I though it might be two low a volume for 2 carbs.

I installed in on the hose from the pump to the carbs. I just cut through the wire covered hose and stuck it inline. So far, so good.

Larry
Larry Ayres

Old post, but a recent thought of mine is, I'm questioning the location of a plastic filter on my TF. My concern on a TF with a rear pump is heat from the exhaust pipe, only 6 inches away, In hot weather and in stop and go traffic over asphalt, the temps down there can get quite high. A plastic filter, after the pump, in that area might leave room for concern. Also, should the aux pump be before or after the main pump? PJ
P Jennings

Paul - Why not install the filter in the engine compartment, where it is easily accessible and away from the exhaust pipe (although I am not sure that is all that much of a problem). As for an auxiliary pump, it can go before or after the primary pump (even in the engine compartment in the position where it was on the TDs and early TFs) - it will work fine in either position. Cheers - Dave
David DuBois

Paul - Why not install the filter in the engine compartment, where it is easily accessible and away from the exhaust pipe (although I am not sure that is all that much of a problem). As for an auxiliary pump, it can go before or after the primary pump (even in the engine compartment in the position where it was on the TDs and early TFs) - it will work fine in either position. Cheers - Dave

Thanks Dave, Sounds good! Even though my tank is clean and lined, I prefer a filter due to an experience I had a few years ago. A tanker was fueling a stations tanks and unbeknown to me, stirred up debris on the bottom of the tank. Had to drain the gas out of my 79 Bronco, with a 460 in it, clean the fuel lines and carburetor. The system was full of rusty powder from the stations tank. Since that issue, I never fuel up at any station where a tanker is refilling their tanks. PJ
P Jennings

I have followed with interest the discussion about filters and additional pumps since we will be adding both – though now I am not so sure about a filter (I always appreciate Dave Dubois’ thorough posts). Don’t forget about the cylindrical filter that fits up into the gas tank from the bottom fuel line coupling. I was not aware that this filter existed. It’s a couple inches long and 3/8” in diameter. I was amazed at how much crud had accumulated there, so it does seem like a nice way to protect the entire system. It’s not a candidate for routine maintenance because you have to drain the tank to pull the thing out, so I would suspect that there are many that have become pretty well clogged.

One question please…. I would rather not use rubber tubing to splice in an auxiliary pump or (maybe) a filter. How have you folks adapted from the existing fuel line to plumb in these devices? Can you use retail plumbing connectors? Do they fit the fuel line? Or do I have to use rubber? Okay, I guess that’s four questions.

Safety? Fast?

Scott Ashworth – ’54 TF
S. R. Ashworth

This thread was discussed between 26/01/2007 and 27/08/2012

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