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MG parts spares and accessories are available for MG T Series (TA, MG TB, MG TC, MG TD, MG TF), Magnette, MGA, Twin cam, MGB, MGBGT, MGC, MGC GT, MG Midget, Sprite and other MG models from British car spares company LBCarCo.

MG TD TF 1500 - Fuel Line Leak

I have a leak or perhaps a better term might be weeping at both ends of my fuel lines where they attach to the carburetors. When I loosened the bolt it appears that the problem is the fiber washers. Not seeing fiber washers on the fuel line page in the Moss catalogue I called them. I was told that on a TD no fiber washer is called for but on a MGA, MGB, and midget they are used. The washers are 5/8
david kirkpatrick

Dave,
The fitting should be a seal with a flared end. No washer needed. Just snug them down a bit once a day for a few days. They'll stop weeping.

If instead the weeping is at the banjos and bolts, a fiber washer is on both sides of those connections. Same advice, just tighten once a day until they stop leaking.

waemly,
dave
Dave Braun

http://www.mossmotors.com/Shop/ViewProducts.aspx?PlateIndexID=32749
or http://www.abingdonsparesllc.com/catpg9detail.html , item 09/63
See #17. Are they new or old? If old you may need to replace them. If new, do as Dave says and re-snug. The face of the float chamber lid has to be really flat and smooth, I have seen one that cracked as well. Sometimes calling Abingdon Spares is a better bet for advice (and some parts too) from Bobby or Bob. George
George Butz

Dave K. (there are entirely to many Daves on this forum) - Whom ever you talked to at Moss is wrong, fiber washers are used on the banjo fittings on the TD carbs. I would do as Dave B. suggests, tighten the bolts a bit each day until the leaks stop. The washers that are in place are probably just fine, it takes a lot of torque on the banjo bolts to keep those joints from leaking. Cheers - Dave D.
David DuBois

Gee, I didnít even look at the carb picture. A little disappointed in the Moss rep though. I am a little paranoid to over tighten the bolts as I would hate to strip something. Being that the washers are over 15 years old I think that I will replace as they seem a little brittle. Thanks for the quick response.
Dave K.
david kirkpatrick

There is a real problem condition. I could send you to the archives, but here's what you'd find:
"Bud Krueger, Massachusetts, USA, budkrueger@earthlink.net

Rick, here's my correspondence with Abingdon Spares about that problem. They had Joe Curto send me the correct washers:
A few weeks ago, while speaking with Bobbi, I mentioned that I think your washer #09-063 has a problem. Yesterday I dug out my vernier and made some measurements. Now I can quantify the problem. Here's what I've found.

Two of these washers are used at the fuel inlet to each carburetor. One goes on either side of the banjo connector (09-111) or its equivalent at the end of the inter-carburetor fuel hose. One washer goes between the banjo connector and the float chamber lid (09-047) where the banjo bolt (09-061) comes out of the banjo connector. The washer has very loose tolerances for this function. It only needs to be large enough in i.d. to fit over the banjo bolt with virtually no restriction on its o.d.

It's the other side of the banjo bolt where the problem manifests itself. If you look at the banjo bolt you'll see that it has a cylindrical surface machined just below the hex head. The 'face' of this surface is what needs to be sealed by the washer. The (outer) side of the banjo connector is machined out to accept this cylindrical surface of the banjo bolt. The washer must have an i.d. that will allow it to slip over the banjo bolt (measured to be 0.652") and an o.d. that is no greater than the diameter of the cylindrical surfaced machined into the face of the banjo connector (measured to be 0.8695").

The washers that I received from you have an i.d of 0.670" and an o.d. of 0.885". An 'old' washer has an i.d. of 0.652" and an o.d. of 0.866 in. When I reinstalled my float lids, after replacing the Grose Jets, I put a new set of washers in and tightened the banjo bolts to a reasonable degree. When I turned on the fuel pump to check for leaks I had fuel all over the place. I gave the banjo bolt another twist and tried again. Still leaking. A bit more torque on the banjo bolt and the leaking stopped. Went for a short spin to see how things were working and came back to the smell of fuel. Sure enough there was fuel leaking from the banjo connection. I took things apart and had a look. The outer washer was being pinched in an attempt to fit inside of the banjo connector. Fortunately, I still had the old washers. The old ones are a nice snug fit into the banjo connector and around the banjo bolt. The new ones are very sloppy

I'm glad that I caught this when I did. I just returned from a 1700+ mile trip and would have been very unhappy if I'd had a fire under the bonnet.

Bud

Check your fiber washers ---- Bud
Bud Krueger (TD10855)

Dave K. If you are going to replace those washers, unless you are going to order other parts from Moss, the shipping on the washers will be ridiculous. Contact me at SUfuelpumps@donobi.net, I can supply the washers for cost plus postage required to send them in an envelope. Cheers - Dave
David DuBois

Gee, I didnít even look at the carb picture. A little disappointed in the Moss rep though. I am a little paranoid to over tighten the bolts as I would hate to strip something. Being that the washers are over 15 years old I think that I will replace. Thanks for the quick response.

Dave K.
david kirkpatrick

Bud, thanks for the info. The Moss rep did tell me that the OD of the fiber washers could vary by 1/16th. Makes you wonder what has happened to quality control.
david kirkpatrick

This thread was discussed between 29/07/2011 and 30/07/2011

MG TD TF 1500 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live MG TD TF 1500 BBS is active now.