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Triumph TR3 - Rebuilding Hydraulic Fluid Reservoir

My fluid reservoir and master cylinder bracket have just received the dazzling Fred Thomas powdercoat treatment (thanks Fred!). In replacing the two nozzle bolts at the bottom of the fluid reservoir, what's a good way to seal up the connections? I'm considering using neoprene washers given my intended use of silicone brake fluid. Good idea? Would the washer go on the inside or outside of the reservoir, or does it make no difference?

Thanks.

Bill Stagg
1960 TR3A
Bill Stagg

Sounds like you have the right idea. I'm pretty sure they're on the inside originally.
Tom

Yes they go inside. You need a really long socket to get down over and around the inner tubular reservoir to tighten the nuts and seal the holes properly.

Don Elliott
Don Elliott

And the socket needs thin walls. Of course, you got it apart, I guess you know that.
Tom

A deep well, thin wall socket did the trick for removal. Now I'm wondering what material to use for the sealing washer in the bottom of the reservoir. Neoprene sound good for silicone brake fluid?

Thanks.

Bill
Bill Stagg

Most black rubber seals will "dissolve" in brake fluid. Mine almost disappeared in there in 3 years. So, I made some new ones out of what I thought might be a gas-resistant rubber. It must be good because it's been there the last 10 years without leaking.

If you get something from a NAPA store, ask if it's gas and/or silicone resistant. Otherwise it may go "gummy". Ask for a bit the size of a penny and let it sit in silicone to check it. But I suppose it may take longer to test it than the time that you have available.

Don Elliott, 1958 TR3A
Don Elliott

I guess you could let the third washer you buy sit in gas for a few days. If it's unaffected, it should be fine with brake fluid. As far as I know, neoprene is pretty much resistant to fluids.
Tom

Yes Tom, that's true but it should be soft enough to compress a bit to conform to any irregularities in the surfaces. If it's too hard, it may not seal, no matterhow much you tighten it.

Don Elliott, 1958 TR3A
Don Elliott

I've located some good-looking neoprene washers that should do the trick. They will compress fine, so longevity in brake fluid should be the only issue. The good folks at NAPA were not sure about the compatibility of neoprene with silicone brake fluid today. I'll try a few more information sources before putting it all together. Installing the master cylinders and clutch slave cylinder and adding silicone fluid to the system are the last things to do before we're rolling again. Whoohoo!

Bill
Bill Stagg

You don't want to wait to the last minute to pour in the fluid. When you do, mke sure you pour it in gently, to avoid bubbles when you are pouring. They'll be a bug . .r to get out later and you may have to wait a long time for them to disappear. Also, bench bleed the 2 master cylinders first.

Here's how from the VTR help site :-

http://www.vtr.org/maintain/brake-bench-bleeding.html

Don Elliott, 1958 TR3A
http://www.zen21606.zen.co.uk/Forum%20Gallery/don3a2_big.jpg
Don Elliott

Thanks again Don,

I do not have the original Triumph Works Manual, neither the Haynes Manual. Any idea where i can find these books in Europe ? Moss ??

I have the book of Bill Pigott, and also the SERVICE INSTRUCTION MANUAL published by " Service Division, Standard - Triumph sales LTD "

I have also the catalogues of Moss ( UK ) and " Anglo
Parts " Belgium. None of those books give me a good explanation of how to handle the disk brakes.

Meanwile, i have removed the two bolts of the caliber and also the the brake hose. Now i can better examine the caliber, and i observe that the cylinder are stained with black spots. I presume this is the reason why the piston are " grabbing "

Should i try to clean them ?? or is it wise to replace them with new ones ???

I very much appreciate your help !

Ciao
Gonzy
Gonzague

I would replace them. They are available from Moss in England. :- sales@moss-europe.co.uk

Revington also have them in stainless steel so they will never rust. :- http://www.revingtontr.com/

I put the originals back into mine after cleaning them smooth with 600 grit black wet and dry sandpaper used in a body shop for restoring paint on cars. I now have more than 160,000 miles total from new in 1958 on them, but since 1990 when I did them last, I have been using silicone brake fluid and this seems to lubricate the pistons better than the original Dot 3 brake fluid.

Snc your last question, I have asked Jean who owns a TR3A as well as a TR6 in belgium to contact you.

Next time you have a new question on a new topic, click on "New thread" along the top menu and start from there.

Don Elliott
http://mysite.freeserve.com/trebor/don3a_big.JPG
Don Elliott

This thread was discussed between 27/03/2004 and 01/05/2004

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This thread is from the archive. The Live Triumph TR3 BBS is active now.