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Triumph TR6 - competition springs

Does anyone know if installing competition springs
in a TR6 will lower it any amount?

Thanks Chris
Christopher Trace

IF THE SPRINSG SAY THEY WILL. IF NOT, THEY MIGHT BE FACTORY HEIGHT WHICH MIGHT ACTUALLY RAISE IT A TOUCH IF YOUR OLD ONES ARE ORIGINAL, BEING THEY HAVE SETTLED OVER THE YEARS
DON KELLY

Talk to the supplier to find out if the springs you are considering will lower the car I bought a set of uprated lowering springs (lowers car about 1" - I like the looks and the ride better) for my 1973 TR6 from Goodparts - he was able to give me info on how much I might expect the car to drop. I have noticed that it is possible to buy uprated standard lenght springs (maybe Moss) one should be very careful about buying these type as you might end up with a car that is actually elevated.
Michael McLaughlin

To maintain stock ride height with an stiffer/uprated spring, the spring would need to be slightly shorter than the stock spring. The real trick regardless of the springs chosen is getting the camber set on the rear of the IRS TR cars. You can always use those aluminum spacers that the factory supplied as a quick and dirty fix, but then you play havoc with your ride height. If you want to do it right you have to play with the different rear arm brackets to get the camber where you want it. As an example, the "from the factory" bracket set up for an early TR6 was the inner bracket was one notch, the outer was a 2 notch and both were mounted notches up. If this set up provides you with, say 3 degrees of negative camber and you want to get to factory callout of 1/4 degree negative to 1 degree positive you would be looking at a total camber change of 2.75 to 4 degrees.

First thing is to check the toe settings front and rear, then you can start playing with the trailing arm brackets. Using your same two brackets, if you take the outer two notcher and position notches down, you have a camber change of 3.4 degrees. The same two brackets with the one nother moved to the outside, notches down and the two notcher moved to the inner and up would result in a camber change of 3.2 degrees. To stay at slightly higher than called out negative camber, then you would use two of the same notch brackets with both notches pointed up or down for a total camber change of 2.3 degrees leaving you at 0.7 degrees negative. The options really start opening up when you throw the three notch brackets into the mix. After all of this is done, go back and double check the rear toe settings and adjust accordingly. The more you changed the camber, the more likely it is that you have to go back and adjust the rear toe settings.

Fortunately for us, someone has done all this homework for us and a table of relative cambers for different bracket combinations can be found in the Moss catalog on the same page with the rear suspension listings. If nothing else, you can always download the PDF files from the Moss Motors website and get the information that way. Since this information was submitted by an individual, Moss offers up the "Your mileage may vary" disclaimer. If nothing else it should at least provide a pretty good jumping off point.
SteveP

This thread was discussed between 18/06/2001 and 19/06/2001

Triumph TR6 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live Triumph TR6 BBS is active now.