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Triumph TR6 - Good parts adjustable trailing Arm brackets

Ok,
I got the adjustable brackets. Figured out from the instructions and some web search how to set them up and adjust for camber. Question is do I still use the shims a if so would the last configuration be the best starting point for proper adjustment OR is there a default setting for the number of shims to use?? Thanks
db
Doug Baker

Think of RG's adjustable brackets as fine tuning. So use all the shims just the way you took it apart. That's what I did and it worked out well. IIRC RG's brackets are the same dimension as stock from the pivot bolt centreline to the back of the bracket. That's why you would use the same shims. Did you install grease fittings on your trailing arms?

Rob
rw loftus

Rob, w/r to grease fittings, no, not yet. Just found good instructions for fitting and use yesterday and therein was the recommendation about adding grease fitting to the BOTTOM of the bushings. Question...where does the TA rotate? At the bolt through the bushing or on the outside of the bushing? If the former, grease to the outside would not help while the latter obviously grease would permit an unrestricted movement. Where might I find instructions for adding the grease fitting? Bit size, etc. Given the fragile nature of the aluminum, I surely do not want to screw something up that'd require new TAs. BTW, anyone have any recommendation w/r to protecting the TA; paint or powder coating? I attempted to PC one of mine with a clear powder and it did not turn out well. Indeed, my experience with PC'ing aluminum has gotten poor results. May well be operator error!! The other options were chrome Powder or painting first with POR-15, then top coating with POR Silver. Just want them to continue to look good, easy to keep clean and not oxidize and get crudy. Thoughts anyone? Thanks.
db
Doug Baker

I don't know where it's supposed to rotate, but if you lub. the bolt and not the outside of the bushing, it will want to rotate on the bolt. If you look at your trailing arms you will probably see a boss cast into the arm the Triumph had originally intended to use as a grease fitting. Mine had them. There is a dimple in the centre if I recall. That is where you drill for the grease fitting. If you get grease fittings with a 1/8" pipe thread, the tap drill size for that is R, which is .339". If you don't have that size of drill, no problem, use 11/32", which is .344". Five thou. differance on a pipe thread won't matter. If you do this use regular varsol as a cutting fluid, it works great on alum.

Rob
rw loftus

Rob,
Thanks. So you drill THROUGH the bushing to the bolt??? Would not have thought of that. Thanks for the info. I have the drill bits, but may have to find a pipe thread tap with that TPI. In a different thread I commented that my TA were manufactured AFTER my car was built. Only explanation is that the TA's were replaced at some point although the car's history does not reflect such a catastrophic event that'd require the TA to be replaced!!
db
Doug Baker

Rob,
A couple of additional questions if you will. Did you have to buy longer bolts anywhere in the installation of the brackets, either the pivot bolts or the bracket mounting bolts? Did you tap the sleeve or just drill the hole through the bushing and the sleeve. I guess it's unlikely but it occured to me that after drilling, the bushing and/or the sleeve might rotate away from the greasing hole!!! Thanks.
db
Doug Baker

Any good tool supplier should have a 1/8" pipe tap, it won't be hard to find. You might not have to drill right through the bushings, mine didn't come right together, I think there was about an 1/8" gap between them. Plenty of room for grease to get where it has to go. No I didn't have to change bolts. If you drill a 1/8" pilot hole throught the arm and sleave, then drill the tap drill after, the small hole will allow grease to get through to the bolt, and if the sleave rotates in the hole it won't matter. I don't think you have to go through the sleave though. If you think about the front end bushings, a lot of those have the sleave rotating in the bushing. Not the bolt in sleave. Or so it seems to me anyway. The only reason guys put in the grease nipples is eliminate the possiblity of any thing squeaking. I did not drill through the sleave (I don't think, it was a few years ago). So just lub. everything up real good, drill and tap into the arms only, not the sleaves and all should be good. I do remember using silicone grease. It won't wash away.

Rob
rw loftus

Roger. All understood. Thanks much.
db
Doug Baker

There are three primary adjustments for the rear suspension, ride height, toe and camber. The shims are used to adjust the toe, you need to continue to use the shims. Richard's brackets are used to adjust the camber and to a (rather) limited degree the ride height. Most of your ride height adjustment is from your springs which also impact the camber hence the adjustable brackets. You can always adjust camber by the old one notch, two notch, three notch, notchs up or down method, but it is tedious and a lot of work. That's why Richard sells so many of the adjustable brackets.

As for finishing the trailing arms, I think the best bet is a good paint. If powder coating aluminum, the amount of time at temperature needs to be kept to the absolute minimum to get the job done.
SteveP1

Doug, why not just call Richard at Good Parts....he'll be glad to help you and talk you through the install and adjustment. I've called on a couple of occasions and he was more then willing to provide help and insight.
JT White

JT,
Thanks for referral. I too have called Richard, David at TRF, Joe Curto, and others when I was perplexed and frustrated with a particular problem, but generally this BBS and a select few "experts" are my first line of resource. The knowledge and experience here is hard to beat. In this case, I think I've figured it out. I would not hesitate to call Richard if needed, but am reluctant to take the time of professionals who are making a living at this, if a colleague or acquaintance is willing to share their experience.
db
Doug Baker

Rob,
Well I sure learned something about NPT taps, drills and grease fittings!! i was expecting an 1/8" fitting and corresponding tap and bit!! NOT!! The fitting is about a 7/16" in dia and the tap the same size. The clerk at my favorite old fashioned, got everything, hardware store explained that the 1/8" is the ID of the pipe for which the NPT 1/8" is the OD threads!!! Anyway, I have all the stuff now to drill and tap the TA's. Thanks much Rod. Never would have thought to do it this way, but makes good sense to have the tapered hole that means it's less likely to back out from vibration.
db
Doug Baker

My pleasure. Yea, the plumbing stuff can be confusing. Everthing is a "nominal pipe size". Meaning that is what it is called but won't measure to that size. One of the reasons for that is you have 3 differant scheduals of black pipe. With schedual 40, 80 and 160, you have differant wall tickness's for regular, heavy and extra heavy pipe. You can't change the outside dia. because you would need 3 differant sizes if fittings to accomadate the 3 differant ods. So the pipe gets smaller in the id. to make for a thicker walled pipe.

Rob
rw loftus

This thread was discussed between 07/12/2012 and 08/01/2013

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