MG-Cars.net

Welcome to our resource for MG Car Information.

Recommendations

Parts

TR parts and Triumph parts, TR bits, Triumph Car Spares and accessories are available for TR2, TR3, TR3A, TR4, TR4A, TR5, TR6, TR7, TR8, Spitfire and Stag and other TR models are available from British car spares and parts company LBCarCo.

Triumph TR6 - Road Spring Specs

Trying to figure out whether to reuse the front springs during the suspension rebuild. Anybody know the unsprung height of normal springs?

Thanks.

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Rick:
Check the Buckeye site tech info... http://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/technical/TR6ShopReference/TR6ShopReferenceData.pdf
It gives height and spring rate info....
Good luck! Rod
Rod Nichols

Thanks Rod. They measure a smidgen over 10 inches. The factory free length spec is 10.03.

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Rick O.,
How many miles on them? Or more to the point,
how many years? Buy fresh, You only want to be in there once.
Christopher Trace

Chris--As far as I know, this is the first time they've been off the 30 year old, 52K mile car. Same for the shocks, which were Armstrong and appeared to have a 1972 date stamp. Was Armstrong an OEM supplier at that time? The shocks had lost over half their motion. Also, the nylon trunnnion bushes were worn clear through!

After I cleaned the springs up, there was a brush of white paint along their length (indicates stock fitment?). They are in excellent condition in need only of some paint due to my brushing them. The PO had Waxoyled everthing, so the external preservation state is very good. I also noticed that the lower spring pad was about twice as thick as the upper (this is not the case with the replacement urethane ones).

You're implying that age alone is sufficient justification to renew the springs, even thought their free-length meets specs. OK, message received.

Any words of wisdom on reattaching the spring pan to the wishbones? The Bentley method (vehicle jack) only works on the way down, not up.

Thanks.

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

To compress the springs for install and for very controlled spring removal, both Roadster and Moss offer a tool that boils down to a plate that fits the spring pan and a threaded rod with washers and nuts. I have the Roadster tools, and have seen pictures of the Moss one, but not the actual tool itself. From the Moss catalog picture, the Roadster tool looks to be a little beefier, but can't really say that to be true or a factor in making a decision. Price wise, I think they run about the same, mid to upper 40's in USD. Even if you have access to a machine shop and could make your own, I doubt that you would be able to do it for much less than that by the time you fiddled with getting the threaded rod, nuts, washers, aluminum plate stock, not to mention your time.

Roadster part # RFT103 for TR4A through TR6 or RFT104 with two plates so it works for TR2 through TR6 for about $20 more

Moss Part #386-895
SteveP

Thanks Steve. I was unaware that there was a tool available (thought it was one of those rare Churchill gizmos that can't be found).

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Rick O
The brush of white paint probably does mean OE springs. White brush for front springs and some other colour for the back springs.
The difference in thickness for the 2 pads seems to ring a bell about raising the front of the car up to meet bumper height requirements in CA. Go for same thickness set.
I agree fully with Chris, replace with new. I made up a spring compression tool using threaded rod. Body was off so had lots of room to work with. MOSS or TRF ..your choice. The threaded rod tool will work very nicely to bring the lower spring pan up gently. I inserted long bolts down the bolt holes of the lower wishbone arm to act as "guides" as the spring was being compressed and the spring pan came up it was guided into place.
Rick, since u are going to have virtually the front end apart, consider poly for both upper and lower wishbones. Another item that is (are) probably 30 yrs old are the trunnions. Not cheap but again, this will probably be the last time you rebuild the front end. Maybe a new front hub bearing?
You are into a few bucks here my friend, but I think you will notice a difference when done not to mention some deffinite piece of mind.
Have fun
Rick C
A tip for you and the rest. I purchased 2 "male" brake line threaded fittings (TRF.. PLATE DN the piece pictured left of DN25). I filled the opening at the cone end with oil resistant silicone. I use this now to cap off a brake line when removing front calipers or the back brake cylinders. I loose very little precious DOT 5 and the whole line does not need to be drained and blead.
Rick Crawford

Rick O.
If the white nylon bushes are worn through I think
you'll find the bronze trunions will also be shot.
Rick C is right about the poly bushes, they give
a nice tight feel very responsive. I made up my
spring compresion tool out of some grade 8 threaded
rod 1/2" dia. grade 8 nuts and some scrap aluminum
plate, very inexpensive.Last bit of advice, rebuild
one side at a time so you have the other side to
compare to.
Christopher Trace

Thanks Rick and Chris. I drove the 25 miles to TRF yesterday and picked up the "last" spring compressor. Worked like you said on the one side I'm reassembling. Yes, I've rebushed everything with poly, new ball joints, new sway bar links, new shocks, new fasteners, rebuilt calipers, etc. I inspected the trunnions and could see no visible wear from the through-bolt. No lateral play when screwed into the vertical link either, so the trunnions are keepers.

Actually, the hardest part was cleaning off 30 years of wax/dirt from all the parts. Next is radiator removal to rebush the sway bar and steering rack mounts and new gaiters "to boot".

BTW--TRF says Lucas will stop making the brake caliper rebuild kits for the early (pre-72 calipers). May be time to stock up!

Merry Christmas to all!

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Rick O.
The nylon bush protects the brozne. The place where
steel to bronze contact takes place is inside upright
threaded hole where the vertical link screws in.
Of course there is grease or oil in there to lubricate
but bronze being so much softer will always be the first to wear. Just have a look in there before you
reassemble. If it is worn you will still have sloppy
feel in the steering even with all the new parts.
Sounds like it's giong to be nice though.
Christopher Trace

Rick O
Refresh my memory please. The caliper rebulid. Is that before the metric thread brake line attachment thread?
Yup, sounds like you are going to have a solid front end.
Rick C
Rick Crawford

Rick C.--Not sure about your caliper question. My '72 has the non-metric "16PB" calipers (TRF rebuild kit GISP2589). The chrome pistons were in excellent condition, so all I had to do was install the kit (cylinder rings, piston boots). The rebuild kit being discontinued from Lucas production is for the early "16P" calipers (TRF #GISP2501; Blue Book p. 251).

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

This thread was discussed between 17/12/2002 and 29/12/2002

Triumph TR6 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live Triumph TR6 BBS is active now.