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Triumph TR6 - Shifting Troubles

Winters here time to work on the car.
I have a 1972 Tr6, I am having diffeculty starting off smooth in first gear. My clutching is low as I understand most Triumphs are, however the clutch seems to be either on or off with no smooth engagement.
I have replaced the clutch master cylinder, slave master cylinder, clutch fork, clutch fork pin, and the clutch shaft, all these where replaced to try to eliminate any excessive play. The clutch and release bearing have from 3000-4000 miles on them.
I would be most greatful if anyone has any ideas or helpful hints.
Dave
Dave

Check out the Buckeye Triumphs (Ohio) Technical site. It sounds like your clutch pressure plate may be one of the new replacements and that's the way they are. They are made for the SAAB and are sold as a substitute spare part for the TR6. In a TR6, they need a lot of foot pressure on the pedal and the springs are so strong that they grab at one point with no smooth transition. Some have kept the old pressure plate and had them re-built to keep that smooth feeling. The pressure plate in my TR3A was installed in 1962 when my first one started to slip. It's as smooth as silk. Since 1962, I've rebuilt it three times - in '65, in '89 and again in 2003. It has over 130,000 miles on it.

http://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/index_technical.htm

Don Elliott, 1958 TR3A
Don Elliott

Hi Dave,

Did you replace your clutch hose as well ? They will collapse from the inside out causing identical symptons as you explained.

Also, to eliminate additional free play, the hole at the top of your pedal may be elongated from constant use via the clevis pin.

I plan on re-welding the hole in my pedal entirely and re-drilling for the pin as new peadls to my knowledge are not available.

Hope this helps, Dino
Dino

Hi Dave

As a starting point do this check RE thrust washer.

http://www.vtr.org/maintain/thrust-washers.html

Bill
Bill Brayford

Dave--Would you say your clutch motion is "sticky"? If so, do as Don suggests and visit the Buckeye site and read the tech article on "sticky clutch". I too had the symptoms you describe and found that honing the gearbox cover that the bearing carrier rides on solved the problem. Next time I pull the gearbox I will be installing the Gunst kit to achieve a modern feel with the clutch. Good luck!

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Dave,
Had the same problem. The culprit was the throwout bearing. It only had 500 miles on it when I started having the sticking problem. Since it was relatively new, I thought it was anything but that.
Mike P
Mike Parkhill

I also have a problem with shifting. Replaced the hose from master to slave and bleedThis did not really help. Seems as if I just can not get the rod to the lever from the slave to move far enough th disengage the clutch. To put the car away this winter I actually had to slide the bar/rod down past the last hole and had the pin hold the rod in place and this gave the required movement to shift. Anybody got ideas
Thanks member signing on at work
dave

Assuming that there is no air in the system I can sum it up with two simple words - "broken pin". I not only had the rod in the last hole, I put a spacer in the slave cylinder to effectively lengthen the rod.

The clutch wasn't that old - 8,00 -10,000 miles. Found the pin sheared. It broke with part of it projecting above the shaft, and the fork rotated slightly and hung on the projection. All shifting was being done via that small piece of metal so it was close to total failure.

Rebuilt with one of the hardened pins, not the bronze/brass one. So far so good.

Brent
Brent B

brent thanks for the info. What pin are we talking about. and can you discribe the fix dave
dave

Oops - the fork that holds the throw-out bearing is secured to the cross shaft with a taper pin. It is usually the first thing to go on our clutchs. It is a transmission or engine removal job. Sorry - too bad it's probably not the pin on the push rod next to the slave cylinder.

BB
Brent B

Dave in Ontario and Dave in Albany - Join and become a member. It's free. Then you will be able to click on "Archive" on the top line menu. I did a search for "taper pin" under TR6 and got all kinds of answers that others have submitted on this topic earlier.

To register :-http://www.british-cars.co.uk/

Then on "Triumph" and fill in the info.

Don Elliott, 1958 TR3A
Don Elliott

Dave- By my old memory, I think there is an article on the Buckeye site. Haven't been there in a while, so forgive me if I am wrong.
Don K.
DON KELLY

THE MOST COMMON CAUSE FOR THE CLUTCH STICKING IS THE THROUGHOUT BEARING COLLAR AND SLIDE THAT IT RIDES ON...OFTEN TIMES AN INEXPERIENCD TECHNICIAN WILL REPLACE THE BEARING ON THE COLLAR BY USING A PUNCH TO BEAT THE COLLAR OFF...THIS WILL CAUSE A HIGH SPOT ON THE END OF THE COLLAR(LOOK CLOSELY)THAT WILL CATCH ON THE SLIDE(NOSE) BOLTED TO THE TRANI...IF THIS HAS BEEN DONE THE ONLY SOLUTION IS TO REPLACE THE COLLAR AND SLIDE WITH NEW OR TO RECONDITION THE PARTS WITH A FILE AND SOME EMERY PAPER
Chip Collingwood

This thread was discussed between 05/01/2004 and 03/02/2004

Triumph TR6 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live Triumph TR6 BBS is active now.