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Triumph TR6 - Temperature send unit.

Any tricks to installing the temperature send unit to the water pump housing. Should I wrap the thread in plumbers tape?
BC
Bryn

Hey Bryn

It's always a good idea to use teflon tape or Locktite PST sealant. I prefer the PST - just a little wipe in the threads works fine.
Brent B

Bryn,
The temperature sensor is a variable ground. As the temperature increases the ground gets better and the guage will read higher. To work properly it must make good contact with the threads in the housing. My recommendation would be to make sure the threads are clean and use no sealants.
Joe Justice
Joe Justice

I just replaces mine. The replacement from TRF came w/ a fiber sealing washer and I used copper anti-sieze on the threads. No leaks.

Do not use pipe tape, the sender needs a good ground.

Best luck. Regards, W

Wayne

There will be ample metal-to-metal contact using pipe tape. As the parts are screwed together the tape is sheared off the tip and most of the screw flight and forced down into the "root" of the threads. The metal screw flights of the male/female parts will be in good contact. Test it out and you'll see what I mean.
Brent B

Just a note here,
Pipe threads come in two major varieties-Tapered, and Non-Tapered.
In a Tapered thread application, the intent is to bring the male and female parts of the joint into "intimate contact, therby creating a seal. By using teflon tape, you can reduce the friction of the threads as you tighten the joint to that point.
On the other hand a Non-Tapered pipe joint will never reach a point of "intimate" contact, so it must have some other method of "seal". In most cases, a "flat" at the base fo the thread is machined for a sealing washer.
In a Non-tapered application, the washer is the primary means of acheiving a seal.
Using teflon tape on a Non-Tapered pipe thread can sometimes make up for the lack of good sealing surfaces for the primary washer, but should not be relied upon for the only sealing method.

Just my opinion, if it makes you feel good (teflon tape) use it, but make shure you have a good washer too.

Mark

Mark R

It appears to be working alarmingly well. Reading 3/4s hot after a stretch on the highway and pushing perilously close to the red zone during extended idles in the city on a hot day. Does this seem right? The unit did not come with a fibre washer but an aluminum ring that fits, I assume, over the threads. What are others operating temps?
Bryn

Bryn--From a cold start, remove your rad cap and let it idle to hot. Check coolant temp with a kitchen thermometer. If it's over 180 at 3/4 registration on your gauge, time to look at radiator work. I had my rad recored and really have to work hard to get it above the 1/2 mark.

Good luck.

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

I tested the coolant with my girlfriends turkey baster (she loved that) and found 140 at 3/4s on the gauge. Running hot, it still pushes over the 3/4 mark and idling it gets scarey; I had to shut it down while waiting at the customs line up yesterday. Maybe a flush out would help?
Bryn

If it's 140 at 3/4 gauge indicated, it sure points to a bad temp sensor in the head. Maybe a bad gauge vibrator also. Do you also have a fuel gauge misindication?

Rick O.
Rick Orthen

Bryn

When I did my engine rebuild I pulled the waterpump and found what looked like a piece of thermostat partially blocking a passage in the waterpump. Previously I always had trouble on a warm day if it idled too long. Now it always runs cool. Probably a long shot for you, but thought I'd throw that information in as well.

Doug
Doug Campbell

The temp send unit is new. The fuel guage and temp gauge are hook up correctly.

Something I did find puzzling thou: there was an aluminum ring washer rather hthen the teflon washer I was expecting. Anyone else install al rather than teflon?
Bryn

Bryn - I just went through a similar cooling dilemma - there is a by-pass hole under the thermostat that can be plugged, and some studs in the water pump volute that can be shortened that I will GUARANTEE fixes the bulk of your overheating problems. Do a search. Of course, the guarantee is as good as the cash that's changed hands.
Brent B

Bryn,
Its in a previous thread, but a 3/4 reading on the guage for 140 degrees may be a voltage stabilizer problem. Either defective or poorly grounded. We went through this a few months ago and the old thread has teh details. I had false high readings due to the VS being ungrounded. Worth checking.

Mark.
Mark Hauser

Bryn

Do yourself a favour and run the car into a rad shop. Don't do CT just a nice little shop. Leave it idling outside and see what there gauges read compared to the interior gauge. They should be able to hook up to the sender for a read and test coolant to compare.

That will tell you were to look?

By the way please check with your girlfriend before using kitchen gadgets. I have no idea what you were using the Turkey baster for? Some thoughts pop up? But a meat thermometer will give a rough reading most likely what you meant?

As I mentioned before you might want to marry that girl?

Bill





Bill Brayford

Meat thermo; thats what I meant. Not much good in the kitchen either it appears. Any way to check the voltage stabilizer. 8 volts out I believe?
Bryn

Hi Bryn

I can't seem to find an exact voltage out put but I think its closer to 12? The idea is to keep the voltage from increasing and varying when the alternator kicks in. They may be matched to the gauges of that era car as many Americans are. I have never done enough testing on TR6 to be sure.

The voltage at the sender should be the same when cars ignition is on not running and running to test. If the temp seems to drop suddenly when the car is shut off and ignition in run something is wrong with regulator. Your fuel gauge should be affected as well?

Did you have the problem prior to the wiring burn up?

If your coolant temp in the rad warmed up thermo open is 140 and your gauge is reading 3/4 short of very badly plugged circulation or pump worn out its likely electrical. Look for flow in the rad after warm up. Most engines like the 180 190 range running and that usually is about 1/2 but each gauge setup varies.

Bill





Bill Brayford

This thread was discussed between 25/06/2003 and 04/07/2003

Triumph TR6 index

This thread is from the archive. The Live Triumph TR6 BBS is active now.